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Weblog Entry

Rollovers in IE

September 19, 2003

To: anyone finding that image-based CSS rollovers ‘blink’ in Internet Explorer, traditional or Pixy method:

Tools > Internet Options > General > Temporary Internet Files > Settings

Move the radio button from ‘Every visit to the page’ to ‘Automatically’. Remember? You turned that on to clear up IE’s caching problems? Most users don’t, so you and a handful of other developers are the only one experiencing the blink. Rejoice.

From: someone who was in the same boat until a particularly frustrating evening of testing many moons ago.


Reader Comments

1
September 19, 11h

Aaaaahhhhhhhh………! The light just came back on. Thank you for that.

2
foO says:
September 22, 09h

*ACK* man, i’ve been wondering about that damn ‘blink’ in IE for ages… could never figure out why it did it, yet others said they didnt get a “blink” in IE.

thanks man! now i feel dumb…. :)

3
September 23, 05h

Holy cow! That’s amazing. I actually thought I hadn’t set that (I use meta tags to force refreshes) until I tried out Pixy’s example - and gagged at how awful it looked… then I checked the setting. Dang. Mezzoblue doesn’t strobe the header on me either now. :-)

4
mike says:
September 23, 12h

Hmm.. I posted a comment but it is now… Gone!

Anyway, Dave and Matt, maybe it’s my ISP, maybe something else, but I get flicker on both Photomatt and now on Mezzoblue - even when I set to ‘Never’.

We used to have that problem on our site, but it disappeared after we switched hosts (to one in Vancouver, no less). While searching around though, I found that there was mention of some sort of IE bug.

Am I the only one seeing this still here?

5
mike says:
September 23, 12h

Hmm.. I posted a comment but it is now… Gone!

Anyway, Dave and Matt, maybe it’s my ISP, maybe something else, but I get flicker on both Photomatt and now on Mezzoblue - even when I set to ‘Never’.

We used to have that problem on our site, but it disappeared after we switched hosts (to one in Vancouver, no less). While searching around though, I found that there was mention of some sort of IE bug.

Am I the only one seeing this still here?

6
mike says:
September 23, 12h

Sorry for the double - seems it’s one of those days…

7
blakems says:
September 25, 12h

Has anyone tried this method posted here http://archivist.incutio.com/viewlist/css-discuss/30707

You change the .htaccess file on your server so it doesn’t run into that caching problem.

8
SkyeFlye says:
September 01, 12h

I haven’t tried that .htaccess method yet but it is illuminating and could help in an Apache environment. Thanks for sharing.

I have to concur with what Mike (comments 3/4) suggested about this being an “ISP” issue. It actually seems to be determined by some setting on the server, or perhaps a certain firewall setting, or maybe something else even more arcane.

Right now, I have the same exact web site (exactly the same files) on two different Windows, IIS servers which are on two completely separate networks which I am both accessing via the internet. The site on one of the servers exhibits the “flicker” while the same site on the other server has no flicker at all. Both servers in question are remote to my workstation (meaning: separated over the internet), but a third, development server on my local network does not display the flicker in IE either. Of course, the flicker does not occur in Mozilla on any server.

I am just guessing here, but I don’t think that this is a bandwidth or even a processing speed issue on either the client side or the server side. I think it has to do with how the client is instructed to “cache” (or not cache) certain items through “document headers” sent by the server.

By “document headers” I am not referring to <meta> tags in the <head> tag of an HTML file. Document headers are not in the source code of a web page or something that is stored inside GIF or JPEG files either. They are little bits of code that a device which is loading and displaying a file being downloaded (a device such as a web browser) can use (or ignore) to “figure out” how to best display the file, as well as whether or not to cache it, or any other number of things.

So, perhaps one of the two remote servers in my case is somehow sending a document header that IE is interpreting as, “Do not cache this file”. IE therefore caches the files from one server, but not from the other. The server whos files are not getting cached exhibits the flicker.

I need to find a tool that will allow me to examine the document headers being sent by an IIS web server.

Thanks for the input above! This has been very helpful.